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EDAD 5050/6050/7050 Syllabus

Course Syllabus

EDAD 5050/6050/7050 - Educational Law

3 Credit Hours

Course Information

Course Description:

Educators must know the laws that govern the operation and conduct of their organizations as they face a highly litigious society. This course is a study of the relevant legal principles that affect the operation, organization, and leadership of American schools. Practicing teachers, prospective teachers, as well as practicing and aspiring school leaders will gain knowledge about legal issues that will help them in effectively performing their professional duties within the boundaries of constitutional, statutory, and case law.

Candidates for administrative licensure who have taken this course can apply an understanding of how specific laws at the local, state, and federal level affect school personnel and students.  Focus of the course is at building level leadership personnel.

Course Outcomes:

As a result of this course, the student will: 

  • Apply the knowledge of law and an understanding of ethical principles in decision making while considering the impact of those decisions on the school community.
  • Apply the mandates of Constitutional law, statutory law, case law and other legal requirements regarding student rights and responsibilities.
  • Apply the mandates of Constitutional law, statutory law, case law and other legal requirements regarding teacher rights and responsibilities.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of and a willingness to follow the legal guidelines regarding religious expression in public schools.
  • Apply constitutionally guaranteed Due Process and Equal Protection rights in all circumstances involving members of the school community
  • Understand and equitably apply legal mandates regulating special education issues.
  • Establish and monitor affirmative policies and procedures for supervision of and protection of students from injury.
  • Understand and apply the mandates of employment law in the public education sector.
  • Establish a cooperative school culture that encourages high levels of cooperation among all members of the community.
  • Demonstrate an ability to anticipate and address future issues of law according to established legal principles.

Tennessee Standards for Instructional Leaders Standards (TILS) for COE Conceptual Framework and ISLLC National Standards Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions (KSD)

Standard B. Culture for Teaching and Learning: An ethical and effective instructional leader collaborates with stakeholders to create and sustain an inclusive, respectful and safe environment conducive to learning and growth for all.

3. Fosters a safe, respectful, and orderly environment for all.

Standard D. Resource Management: An ethical and effective instructional leader facilitates the development of a highly effective learning community through processes that enlist diverse stakeholders and resources.

2. Includes a diverse set of educators and stakeholders in school improvement decisions

Instructional Strategies Used in EDAD 5050

  • Lecture                                                                
  • Instructional technology with the Desire2Learn website
  • Online research
  • Field experience: interview with the school attorney or sitting judge
  • Research legal cases and develop case briefs
  • Problem-based learning exercises
  • Legal School-Based Scenarios
  • Online group discussion
  • Electronic submission of assignments through the dropbox
Prerequisites & Co-requisites:

None

Course Topics:
Module 1 - Legal Framework Affecting Public Schools
Module 2 - Religion and the Public Schools
Module 3 - Students’ Rights and Restrictions and Individuals with Disabilities
Module 4 - National Security, School Safety, and the Instructional Program
Module 5 - School Desegregation
Module 6 - Liability of School Personnel, the School District, and Student Records
Module 7 - Teacher Freedoms and Teacher Recruitment, Tenure, Dismissal, and Due Process
Module 8 - Discrimination in Employment
Specific Course Requirements:

Textbooks, Supplementary Materials, Hardware and Software Requirements

Required Textbooks:

Please visit the Virtual Bookstore to obtain textbook information for this course. Move your cursor over the "Books" link in the navigation bar and select "Textbooks & Course Materials." Select your Program, Term, Department, and Course; then select "Submit."

Supplementary Materials:

RESOURCES FOR EDAD 5050 – LEGAL RESEARCH AND READING

Your University Library

Please use your university library to research your cases. You can logon to that library through your home or office computer to access the electronic databases and you may also logon off campus. Three databases that will be most helpful to students as they research case law include: Westlaw, Wilson Web, and Lexis-Nexis.

Online Resources

No Child Left Behind

Supreme Court and Federal Court Electronic Newsletter Sites:

  • http://www.findlaw.com = This site is a directory that helps you find any site on the web that is law related.
  • http://newsletters.findlaw.com = Findlaw Newsletter Subscription Center will permit you to follow almost any state or federal court in the country and receive an automatic newsletter with case citation and full decision. There is no cost to subscribe.
  • lii@lii.law.cornell.edu = The Legal Information Institute of Cornell Law School provides automatic email newsletter of U.S. Supreme Court decisions with minutes after they are decided. The service operates during the Supreme Court term but you may access it and sign up for its services at any time.
  • https://www.supremecourt.gov/ = The Supreme Court’s website. Go there!
  • http://www.loc.gov/law/ = The U.S. House of Representatives Internet Law Library
  • www.uscourts.gov = U.S. Federal Judiciary site.
  • http://www.thecre.com/fedlaw/default.htm = Fedlaw – links to federal laws and regulations – 61 categories of laws. If you wish to look up full text of copyright law, FERPA, or IDEA, here is the place to go.
  • First Amendment (Grievance, Religion, Assembly, Speech, Press)
  • https://www.freedomforuminstitute.org/freedom-forum/ = Freedom Forum site.
  • http://www.splc.org/ = Student Press Law Center.
  • Fourth Amendment Sites (Search and Seizure)
  • http://www.keepschoolssafe.org/ = This is the School Search Reference Guide, 1999, in two parts: Reference Guide and School Search Checklists. It was prepared by the National Association of Attorneys General.
  • https://www.aaup.org = American Association of University Professors’ page on tenure and due process.
  • http://fear.org/1/ = Forfeiture Endangers American Rights is a national non-profit organization dedicated to the reform of asset forfeiture, laws to restore due process, and protect property rights of innocent victims. A very impressive set of home pages.

Copyright and Fair Use

Student Records (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act = FERPA)

Exceptional Student Education

Organizational Sites

Periodicals

  • Courtside A monthly column by Dr. Perry Zirkel in The Kappan, the monthly journal of Phi Delta Kappa.
  • Legal Memorandum Published five times a year by the National Association of Secondary School Principals.
  • The Bulletin Monthly professional journal published by the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Every other issue has an article discussing a specific legal topic or issue of interest to a school administrator.
  • School Law Reporter Published monthly by the Education Law Association.

Other Print References

  • Alexander, K., & Alexander, M. D. (2011). American public school law (8th Ed.). Belmont CA: Wadsworth.  
  • Aquila, F.D. (2007). School law for K-12 educators: Concepts and Cases. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, Inc.
  • Beckwith, F.J. (2003). Law, Darwinism, and public education: The establishment clause and the challenge of intelligent design. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Bloomfield, D.C. (2007). American public education law primer. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Bosher, W.C., Kaminski, K.R., & Vacca, R.S. (2004). The school law handbook: What every leader needs to know. Alexandria: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.
  • Bosworth, M.H. (2001). Courts as catalysts: State supreme courts and public school finance equity. Ithaca: State University of New York Press.
  • Bradley, L.H. (2005). School law for public, private, and parochial educators. Lanham: Scarecrow Education.
  • Cambron-McCabe, N.H., McCarthy, M.M., & Thomas, S.B.  (2013). Seventh edition. Public school law: Teachers’ and students’ rights. Columbus: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Cibulka, J.G., Cooper, B.S., & Fusarelli, L.D. (Eds.). (2008). Handbook of education politics and policy. New York: Routledge Education.
  • Crabtree, T.L., Gartin, B.C., & Murdick, N.L. (2006). Special education law. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
  •  Dunklee, D.R., & Shoop, R.J.(2006). The principal’s quick-reference guide to school law: Reducing liability, litigation, and other potential legal tangles. Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press.
  •   Fiske, E.B., & Ladd, H.F. (2007). Handbook of research in education finance and policy. New York: Routledge Education.
  •  Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004
  •  Kaufman, M. J., & Kaufman, S.R. (2004). Education law, policy, and practice: Cases and materials. New York: Aspen Publishers.
  •  Lamorte, M.W. (2007). School law: Cases and concepts. Columbus: Allyn & Bacon.
  •  Lukemeyer, A. (2003). Courts as policymakers: school finance reform litigation. LFB Scholarly El Paso: Publishing.
  •  Palestini, K., & Palestini, R.H. (2006). Law and American Education: A Case Brief Approach. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  •  Valente, C.M., & Valenyte, W.D. (2004). Law in the Schools. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
  •  Williamson, M. (2006). Courting failure: How school finance lawsuits exploit judges’ good intentions and harm our children. Bozeman: Hoover Press.
  •  Yell, M.L. (2005). Law and Special Education. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
Hardware and Software Requirements:

Minimum hardware requirements can be found here.

Minimum software requirements can be found here.

Common applications you might need:

Web Resources:

Purdue OWL Online Writing Lab (for APA, MLA, or Chicago style)

The Writing Center Online Writer's Handbook

Student Resources:
  • Technical support information can be found on the TN eCampus Help Desk page.
  • Smarthinking virtual tutoring is available FREE of charge. to access Smarthinking, visit the course homepage and select Smarthinking under Course Resources. You also view sample sessions to see what Smarthinking offers and how it works.
  • Information on other student issues or concerns can be located on the TN eCampus Student Resources page.

Instructor Information

Please see "Instructor Information" in the Getting Started Module for instructor contact information, virtual office hours, and other communication information. You can expect to receive a response from the instructor within 24-48 hours unless notified of extenuating circumstances.

Participation, Assessments, & Grading

Grading Procedures:

Point System Used for Assignments and Activities

Orientation Assignments

Assignment

Maximum Points

Autobiography

15

Student Profile (completed on course homepage)

15

Discussion Forums

Discussion Forum Postings (16 points per forum)

192

Briefs of Landmark Cases In School Law

Scopes v. State of Tennessee

30

Tinker v. Des Moines

30

New Jersey v. Des Moines

30

Goss v. Lopez

30

Brown v. Board of Education

30

Culminating Assignments

Analysis of the School Safety Plan

100

TOTAL POINTS

472 POINTS

Extra Credit Assignments

Discussion Forums (2 forums at 16 pts each)

32

San Antonio School District v. Rodriquez case brief

30

Lau v. Nichols case brief

30

Grading Scale:

FINAL GRADE CALCULATION SCALE

Points

472 -   424  = A              
Excellent: Work of exceptional quality that indicates the highest level of attainment in the course
 
423 - 377 = B                 
Good: work is above average, which indicates a high level of achievement
 
376 - 330 = C                 
Work of average quality representing substantial fulfillment of the course essentials
 
329 or fewer  = D/F        
Must retake the course - represents unacceptable performance in the course

Criteria Used in the Analysis - Rubric for the School Safety Plan 

UNACCEPTABLE

 7 OR FEWER POINTS

ACCEPTABLE

8 POINTS

DEVELOPING

 9 POINTS

EXEMPLARY

 10 POINTS

The concept of school safety is alluded to in the school mission statement

School mission statement is addressed but the relation to school safety is not addressed or the mission statement is not addressed.

School mission statement is discussed with relation to school safety.

School mission statement is analyzed and discussed with relation to school safety.

School mission statement is fully analyzed and discussed with relation to school safety.

Procedures for evaluating and responding to threats

The procedures for evaluating and responding to threats are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

The procedures for evaluating and responding to threats are discussed.

The procedures for evaluating and responding to threats are analyzed and discussed.

The procedures for evaluating and responding to threats are fully analyzed and discussed in detail.

Potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate

Potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

Potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate are discussed.

Potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate are analyzed and discussed.

Potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate are fully analyzed and discussed in detail.

Methods to control campus access

Methods to control campus access are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

Methods to control campus access are discussed.

Methods to control campus access are analyzed and discussed.

Methods to control campus access are fully analyzed and discussed in detail.

Specifically identified roles and responsibilities

Specifically identified roles and responsibilities are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

Specifically identified roles and responsibilities are discussed.

Specifically identified roles and responsibilities are analyzed and discussed.

Specifically identified roles and responsibilities are fully analyzed and discussed in detail

Specific individual or agency to call in a crisis

Specific individual or agency to call in a crisis are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

Specific individual or agency to call in a crisis are discussed.

Specific individual or agency to call in a crisis are analyzed and discussed.

Specific individual or agency to call in a crisis are fully analyzed and discussed in detail

Strategies to provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community

Strategies to provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community are either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

Strategies to provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community are discussed.

Strategies to provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community are analyzed and discussed.

Strategies to provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community are fully analyzed and discussed in detail

An emergency operation communication system

An emergency operation communication system is either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

An emergency operation communication system is discussed.

An emergency operation communication system is analyzed and discussed.

An emergency operation communication system is fully analyzed and discussed in detail

A uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system

A uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system is either not sufficiently discussed or not addressed.

A uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system is discussed.

A uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system is analyzed and discussed.

A uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system is fully analyzed and discussed in detail

Recommendations for improvement

Few recommendations are made for improving the safety plan.

 

Recommendations for improving the safety plan are made.

 

Recommendations for improving the safety plan are based on the information in the school plan.

Excellent recommendations for improving the safety plan are based on a solid evaluation of all the information in the school plan.

 

EDAD 5050: ANALYSIS OF THE DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SCHOOL STAKEHOLDERS - Worksheet

 

Name of Candidate:

 

School Name:

 

School System:

 

Name of School Stakeholder

Stakeholder
Role

Area Expertise

Gender

Age

Race and/or Ethnicity

Power to Influence Decision Making

Opportunities to Communicate
(When, where?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adapted from Best Practices for Stakeholder Participation in Health Impact Assessments – March 2012 Stakeholder Participation Working Group of the 2010 HIA in the Americas Workshop 

Assignments and Projects:

There are two key assignments for EDAD 5050: Analysis of the School Safety Plan

ANALYSIS OF THE SCHOOL SAFETY PLAN

Obtain a copy of the school safety plan for your school or use one of the school safety plans located on the dropbox for this assignment. The National School Safely Center has developed guidelines to enhance safety for schools and schools are free to develop guidelines that exceed those suggested by the safety center. Use the following nine guidelines to use in your analysis of the school safety plan. Follow up with an interview with your school leader to determine how this plan was developed and how it is currently being implemented and monitored.

In the school’s mission statement, did the plan identify the context for which the school wished the academic learning to take place?

  • Did the plan identify a specific procedure for evaluating and responding to threats?
  • Did the plan identify potential disasters that could occur based on the school’s setting and climate.
  • Was there information on how campus access could be controlled?
  • Did the plan identify specifically assigned roles and responsibilities?
  • Did the plan identify whom to call in a crisis?
  • Did the plan provide cultural awareness and sensitivity training for all members of the school community?
  • Did the pan stablish an emergency operation communication system?
  • Did the plan implement a uniform school crime-reporting and record-keeping system?

The analysis for the school safety plan assignment is designed to meet the following Tennessee Instructional Leadership Standard:

TILS B. Culture for Teaching and Learning

An ethical and effective instructional leader collaborates with stakeholders to create and sustain an inclusive, respectful and safe environment conducive to learning and growth for all.

3. Fosters a safe, respectful, and orderly environment for all.

REQUIRED COURSE ACTIVITIES AND ASSIGNMENTS

AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND STUDENT PROFILE

For the first assignment, each student is to submit a one full page biographical sketch - double spaced. The purpose of this activity is for students to introduce themselves. The biographical sketch should include but is not limited to your professional experience, your expectations from this course, your level of expertise with Desire2Learn, and any other information that you want to share.

Make sure that your student profile is completed on the course homepage. It is essential for you to add an alternative email address and phone number in case you must be contacted by the professor during the semester.

WEEKLY DISCUSSION FORUM POSTINGS

Each student is required to respond to the weekly discussion forums posted by the professor at least once per week. You must also reply to at least one other student’s posting each week to earn points on your weekly posting. Post your reply to the discussion forum by Wednesday so that other students can reply to your posting and you can reply to their postings.

The discussion forums address the weekly textbook readings. Each posting should provide a citation to support your ideas. The rubric used to evaluate your postings is on the Content page of the course website. Discussion forum postings may not be submitted as email attachments after the deadline.

TWO SELF-ASSESSMENTS

Students are required to submit self-assessments two times during the term. The purpose of this activity is for students to reflect on their learning experiences in the course and provide this feedback to the professor.

It would be helpful for students to keep a journal during this semester to reflect on what they have learned and how it applies to their professional and personal lives. Using this journal, the self-assessment that students are required to submit as an assignment roughly every month can serve as an accurate reflection on what students have learned that they did not know before and what this new learning means to them. The rubric used to evaluate your self-assessments is located on the Content page of the course website.

FIVE CASE BRIEF ASSIGNMENTS

Students are asked to develop briefs for specific landmark cases in school law. Each case was selected to compliment each module. By reading and researching case law, the graduate student in education is getting a comprehensive knowledge of the legal factors that have influenced public schools. Here are the five different cases:

SCOPES V. STATE, 289 S.W. 363 (Tenn. 1927). Develop a brief for the famous "monkey trial" in Tennessee that put the teaching of evolution on trial - Scopes v. the State of Tennessee the evolution.

TINKER V. DES MOINES INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT, 393 U.S. 503, 89 S.CT. 733, 21 L.ED.ED. 73 Develop a brief for the landmark case on student rights to political free speech in school - Tinker v. Des Moines.

NEW JERSEY V. T.L.O. 469 U.S. 325, 105 S. CT. 733. Develop a brief of the landmark case on constitutionality of the search of students by school officials - New Jersey v. T.L.O. 

GOSS V. LOPEZ, 419 U.S. 565, 95 S. CT. 729.  Develop a brief of the important case on procedural due process rights of students for temporary suspension - Goss v. Lopez.

BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION OF TOPEKA 347 U.S. 483, 74 S. CT. 686.  Develop a brief of the landmark case on the inherent inequality of separate-but-equal facilities - Brown v. Board of Education.  

To research each case, the professor has posted information on the US. Supreme Court rulings from the online data base Lexus Nexus and a list of websites that are important for online legal research. The textbook also has information on these cases. Use these resources as a starting point to research these cases.

Each brief should be double space typed and should be at least four pages in length. Provide citations in the text and a reference list for each brief. All briefs must use three outside sources for each case in addition to the textbook. Use APA format for citing your sources in text and in your reference list. Use the 12 point font with one inch margins.

The briefs should use the following outline with subheadings for each of the nine points in the outline:

  • Complete citation. For example, San Antonio v. Rodriguez, 411 U.S. 1, 93 S.CT. 1278, 36 L.ED. 16.
  • Parties involved in the case. Explain who the individuals are who were the parties involved in the case. Who were the plaintiffs and who were the defendants?
  • The date and place where the case was tried. Research each case and explain where the case was tried in the trial court, appellate court, state supreme court and U.S. Supreme Court.
  • The facts of the case. Provide details on the important facts of each case.
  • Issues or legal questions raised in each case. Explain what the particular issue or legal questions that are addressed in the case.
  • The trial court's, appellate court's and Supreme Court's decisions and rationale for each issue. Be certain to explain the decision from each court. Do not use only the U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
  • The educational implications of each case.
  • The student's personal view and observations on the case; and
  • A list of three outside references used to research the case in addition to the textbook. Please use scholarly journals or databases.

Locate the sample of a case brief on the Content page of the course website. Please print it out and use it as a guide to developing your own case briefs. The five leading school law cases that are to be researched, summarized, and formatted using APA format are:

For extra credit, choose one of the following cases to research – develop a case brief and submit for up to 30 points of extra credit:

SAN ANTONIO V. RODRIGUEZ, 411 U.S. 1, 93 S.CT. 1278, 36 L.ED. 16. Develop a brief of the landmark case on equity in school financing based upon wealth of parents.

VERONIA SCHOOL DISTRICT V. ACTON, 515 U.S. 646 (1995). Develop a brief of this interesting landmark case dealing with drug abuse and urinalysis testing.

NEWDOW V. U.S. CONGRESS, 523 U.S. 1 (2004). Develop a brief on this important and unsettled case with the Pledge of Allegiance.

LEMON V. KURTZMAN, 403 U.S. 602 (1971).  This is a most interesting case that set the standard for determining most cases of religion in the public schools. Although it has been bent in the winds of the court, it still stands as the seminal case in this area.

BOARD OF EDUCATION V. ROWLEY, 458 U.S. 176 (1982). This early disability case took on a life of its own for many years.

HONIG V. DOE, 484 U.S. 305 (1988). An early case form California, this case set the standard for disciplining students with disabilities for many years. 

LEE V. WEISMAN, 112 S. CT.2649 (1992). This major case deals with the interesting and ongoing controversy of prayer at school events.

Class Participation:

Absence Policy and This Online Course - Online courses are designed to be highly interactive and collaborative, as authentic learning takes place within a social context.  To help ensure an effective learning experience, all students in online courses are expected to participate on a regular basis.  Participation is defined as “submitting required work as assigned; being an active contributor and responder to fellow students and the instructor in a timely basis, as set forth by online discussion guidelines in each course.”

Failure to participate may be counted as an absence.  If technical circumstances prevent a student from entering the course site for a period of time, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor in a timely manner if the student wishes to receive credit for any missed online activities.

Late Policy:

Late assignments will be subjected to two penalty points for each day that the assignment is late unless justified by a medical emergency or technical difficulties with the server. This includes weekends and holidays. Assignments more than seven days late will not be accepted or will receive a deduction of 25% of the maximum grading points for that module (per decision by the instructor)

The grade of "Incomplete" is not given in this course for students who have not fulfilled the course requirements and only need additional time. There must be extenuating circumstances that should be submitted in a letter documenting your reasons for needing additional time to complete the requirements to Dr. Dunbar for approval well in advance of the last day of the course.

Course Ground Rules

The following two statements (1., 2.) were derived from the TBR System-wide Student Rules document, released January 2012:

RULES OF THE TENNESSEE BOARD OF REGENTS STATE UNIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM OF TENNESSEE SYSTEMWIDE STUDENT RULES CHAPTER 0240-02-03 STUDENT CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY SANCTIONS

Read the document in its entirety here.

1. Standards of Conduct:

  • Students are required to adhere to the same professional, legal and ethical standards of conduct online as on campus. In addition, students should conform to generally accepted standards of "netiquette" while sending e-mail, posting comments to the discussion board, and while participating in other means of communicating online. Specifically, students should refrain from inappropriate and/or offensive language, comments and actions.

2. Review the TN eCampus Academic Integrity/Academic Honesty Policy:

  • In their academic activities, students are expected to maintain high standards of honesty and integrity. Academic dishonesty is prohibited.

Such conduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • an attempt by one or more students to use unauthorized information in the taking of an exam
  • to submit as one's own work, themes, reports, drawings, laboratory notes, computer programs, or other products prepared by another person,
  • or to knowingly assist another student in obtaining or using unauthorized materials.

Plagiarism, cheating, and other forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited.

Students guilty of academic misconduct, either directly or indirectly through participation or assistance, are subject to disciplinary action through the regular procedures of the student’s home institution.  Refer to the student handbook provided by your home institution to review the student conduct policy.

In addition to other possible disciplinary sanctions that may be imposed, the instructor has the authority to assign an "F" or zero for an activity or to assign an "F" for the course.

Other Course Rules:

Students are expected to:

  • Participate in all aspects of the course
  • Communicate with other students
  • Learn how to navigate in Brightspace
  • Keep abreast of course announcements
  • Use the assigned course management (Brightspace) email address rather than a personal email address
  • Address technical problems immediately:
  • Observe course netiquette at all times.

Guidelines for Communications

Email:

  • Always include a subject line.
  • Remember without facial expressions some comments may be taken the wrong way. Be careful in wording your emails. Use of emoticons might be helpful in some cases.
  • Use standard fonts.
  • Do not send large attachments without permission.
  • Special formatting such as centering, audio messages, tables, html, etc. should be avoided unless necessary to complete an assignment or other communication.
  • Respect the privacy of other class members

Discussions:

  • Review the discussion threads thoroughly before entering the discussion. Be a lurker then a discussant.
  • Try to maintain threads by using the "Reply" button rather starting a new topic.
  • Do not make insulting or inflammatory statements to other members of the discussion group. Be respectful of other’s ideas.
  • Be patient and read the comments of other group members thoroughly before entering your remarks.
  • Be cooperative with group leaders in completing assigned tasks.
  • Be positive and constructive in group discussions.
  • Respond in a thoughtful and timely manner.

Library

The Tennessee Virtual Library is available to all students enrolled in TN eCampus programs and courses. Links to library materials (such as electronic journals, databases, interlibrary loans, digital reserves, dictionaries, encyclopedias, maps, and librarian support) and Internet resources needed by learners to complete online assignments and as background reading will be included within the course modules. To access the Virtual Library, go to the course homepage and select the Virtual Library link under Course Resources.

Students with Disabilities

Qualified students with disabilities will be provided reasonable and necessary academic accommodations if determined eligible by the appropriate disability services staff at their home institution. Prior to granting disability accommodations in this course, the instructor must receive written verification of a student's eligibility for specific accommodations from the disability services staff at the home institution. It is the student's responsibility to initiate contact with their home institution's disability services staff and to follow the established procedures for having the accommodation notice sent to the instructor.

Syllabus Changes

The instructor reserves the right to make changes as necessary to this syllabus. If changes are necessitated during the term of the course, the instructor will immediately notify students of such changes both by individual email communication and posting both notification and nature of change(s) on the course bulletin board.

Disclaimer

The information contained in this syllabus is for general information purposes only. While we endeavor to keep this information up-to-date and accurate, there may be some discrepancies between this syllabus and the one found in your online course. The syllabus of record is the one found in your online course. Please make sure you read the syllabus in your course at the beginning of the semester. Questions regarding course content should be directed to your instructor.


Last Revised on March 12, 2019